Assignments

Chapter 8 Problem Set Part 1

Dec. 05, 2019 Max Points: 100

Exhibition Project

Dec. 19, 2019 Max Points: 100

Week 3

Nov. 22, 2019 Max Points: 10

Chapter 7 Problem Set

Nov. 17, 2019 Max Points: 100

Chapter 6 Part Two

No Due Date Max Points: 35

Week 2

Nov. 08, 2019 Max Points: 10

Week 1

Nov. 01, 2019 Max Points: 10

Chapter 6 Quiz

Nov. 04, 2019 Max Points: 42

Chapter 6 Part 1

Nov. 01, 2019 Max Points: 58

Dress Up bonus

No Due Date Max Points: 1

Announcements

Dec. 06, 2019

Here is an example of partial fraction decomposition. When my computer restarts I’ll attach some screens from the text here too. It really is a cool concept and useful for derivatives later on.

Calculus is going to be a lot less all over the place. Pre-calc has SOOO much content in it. I wish it was an entire year, maybe we can try that next year. But it’s great to get as much in as we can. I know it’s been tough but I’m telling you, you will appreciate the hard work and challenges you’re able to overcome in this class come college time. I know you all can do it. See you tomorrow. Come ready to work. I’ll answer all and any questions you have.

Dec. 03, 2019
Dec. 02, 2019

Determinants and Cramer's Rule

Dec. 02, 2019

Lots of cool stuff coming up this week! Here are some important things you should look over before / during / after class today

Nov. 22, 2019

This video does a good job explaining the math ANDA what’s going on in the satellite problem.

The cool part about the satellite problem is that it gives you a new way to think about a parabola. How important and unique the focus is. What other applications could you find something like this useful?

Nov. 21, 2019
Nov. 20, 2019

8.2 / 8.3

Nov. 16, 2019

https://www.desmos.com/calculator/lpfb5tswzn

Here we have from algebra 2:

y = a(x-h)^2+k

with focus given by solving a = 1/4c
In pre-calc (and for good reason, the latus rectum to help us get a better graph and more)

(x-h)^2=4p(y-k)

with focus length |4p|, where p is your c value (so 4 (1/4) yeilds 1, which would give us the original y = x^2 as desired)

Nov. 15, 2019

Helpful

Nov. 15, 2019

Marcel had a question about the Latus Rectum question on the HW. I constructed a little geogebra applet for you to mess around with:

Remember, all points on a parabola are equidistant from a fixed line outside the parabola called a directrix and a fixed point inside the parabola called a focus

Notice in the applet how as you move point A, the distance from the directrix and focus are the same, no matter where it is. It is very evident at the vertex (since it is just vertical distances that are easier to "see").

Now, notice the two points L1 and L2 ? those are the endpoints of the latus rectum. This line is parallel to either the x or y axis (depending on what type of parabola you have). It also goes through the focus. And the even cooler thing is that the focus of the parabola is the midpoint of the latus retum!

So, if you are given the endpoints, find the midpoint. Boom, there is the focus.

Now you have the focus (so your c value included in your vertex). Just need your vertex. Sub into eqn and solve the system. you are good to go.

https://www.geogebra.org/classic/v4g7qdtx

Nov. 14, 2019

hyperbolas

Nov. 12, 2019

ch 6 prob set key

Nov. 12, 2019

Chapter 7 Slides (missing hyperbolas)

Nov. 03, 2019

6.5 Log Equations and Inequalities

Look over these notes before class tomorrow, then look over the problem set. Going to give a short quiz after a 10 minute review on chapters 6.1 - 6.4 tomorrow.

Oct. 31, 2019

6.4 Exponential Equations and Inequalities