Assignments

Participation Week of 11-01-19

Nov. 01, 2019 Max Points: 50

Crucible Final

No Due Date Max Points: 250

Participation Week of 10/25/19

Oct. 25, 2019 Max Points: 50

Participation Week of 10/18/19

Oct. 18, 2019 Max Points: 50

Plagiarism Activity

Aug. 28, 2019 Max Points: 50

Jeopardy 2nd Place

No Due Date Max Points: 30

The Crucible Act 4 Qs

Oct. 23, 2019 Max Points: 50

Jeopardy 1st Place

No Due Date Max Points: 50

The Crucible Act 3 Qs

Oct. 17, 2019 Max Points: 50

Epitaph Assignment

Oct. 18, 2019 Max Points: 150
Description:

​Epitaph - (n) a phrase or statement written in memory of a person who has died, primarily as an inscription on a tombstone.
Wednesday (10/16/19) - Attach your research by Midnight 10/16/19
Friday (10/18/19) - Attach your epitaph by Midnight 10/18/19
Tuesday (10/23/19) - The final product is due by the end of class on 10/23/19
Attach the typed version of your epitaph to this post by Friday at Midnight. See handout...

Writers Workshop: Sinners in the Angry Hands of God Essay

Oct. 15, 2019 Max Points: 50
Description:

1.R.A.C.E. (Restate. Answer. Cite. Explain) - Yes or no?
2. Thesis responds to prompt?
3. Topic sentences connect to thesis?
4. Body paragraphs stay on topic?
5. Conclusion restates/highlights thesis and main points?
6. APA format? Cover page, headers, page numbers, in-text citations, references page?
7. Grammar?

*Make a minimum of 10 comments that respond to the elements listed above
(Allen & Holt McDougal, 2012, p.122) Direct Quote
(Allen & Holt McDougal, 2012) Indirect Quote

References

Allen, J., & Holt McDougal. (2012). Holt McDougal Literature: Grade 11. Orlando, Fla: Holt

McDougal/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

SITHAG Questions

Sept. 25, 2019 Max Points: 50
Description:

Complete and attatch questions, or upload a picture of hand-written work

Participation Week of 08/26/19

No Due Date Max Points: 50

Syllabus (extra credit)

Aug. 27, 2019 Max Points: 25

My Superhero Biography

Aug. 27, 2019 Max Points: 50

Newsela 9/13/19

Sept. 13, 2019 Max Points: 50
Description:

Minimum Requirements
8 sentences
2 quotes
APA in text citations (Newsela,2019)

Sub EC

No Due Date Max Points: 30

SITHAG Participation

No Due Date Max Points: 30

Native American Policy Era Presentation

Sept. 25, 2019 Max Points: 150
Description:

Answer:
Why did this policy start?
What happened before it went into effect?
How was the policy put into effect?
How was enforced/
How did it end?
What happened to the native Americans as an result of this policy/era?
Minimum 6 slides of CONTENT (title page and reference page not included 8 page TOTAL)
APA Citations
Title page
Reference Page
No more than 80 words per slide
Visually appealing
Ability to present your portion of the slide without reading the slide word for word of the board
***Extra Credit for audio and/or video clips!***

Herblock Cartoon Activity

Sept. 30, 2019 Max Points: 50

The Crucible Ch 1 Qs

No Due Date Max Points: 50

Newsela 10/01/19

Oct. 01, 2019 Max Points: 50

Participation Week of 10/11/19

Oct. 11, 2019 Max Points: 50

Crucible Act 2 Questions

Oct. 11, 2019 Max Points: 50
Description:

We will complete these questions in class during our group discussion surrounding Act 2. Please upload completed responses by the end of class today (10/11/19).

SITHAG Outline

Oct. 10, 2019 Max Points: 50

Jeopardy 2nd Place

Oct. 09, 2019 Max Points: 30

Jeopardy 1st Place

Oct. 09, 2019 Max Points: 50

Sinners in the Angry Hands of God Essay

Oct. 15, 2019 Max Points: 200
Description:

When speakers give persuasive speeches, they utilize a variety of appeals and rhetorical devices to convey messages to their audiences and achieve their ultimate purposes. Write a 2-page essay in which you analyze the rhetorical devices the speaker uses in Sinners in the Angry Hands of God, to persuade his audience and achieve his purpose. The essay must be in 12-point font, Times New Roman font and be in proper APA format.

Choose at least three rhetorical devices (literary elements) that make the work appealing and effectively contribute to the author’s purpose. Then write a thesis statement that identifies the devices and your opinion about their contribution to the work.

Support your thesis statement with precise and relevant examples from the text of the speech. Use direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries of the text to support the ideas in your analysis. Be sure to use parenthetical documentation to give credit to the author if citing from the text (see example below). If using a quote that is longer than three lines, use ellipses (…) to denote missing words, but you must never begin a quote with ellipses. Never drop naked quotes into your essay – you need to introduce your evidence with a transitional/ lead-in sentence (see example below).

Example: Patrick Henry began his speech with a respectful tone that was meant to flatter the men present and make them feel as if he were one of them. His opening statement to the House, “Mr. President: No man thinks more highly than I do of the patriotism, as well as well as the abilities of the very men who have just addressed the House” (Allen & Holt McDougal, 2012), was an ethical appeal to get the audience to trust him and feel a sense of brotherhood with him because he claimed to respect them and support their patriotic ideals.

OR

Example: Patrick Henry began his speech with a respectful tone that was meant to flatter the men present and make them feel as if he were one of them. His opening statement to the House, “Mr. President: No man thinks more highly than I do of the patriotism, as well as well as the abilities of the very men who have just addressed the House” (Allen & Holt McDougal, 2012, p.122), was an ethical appeal to get the audience to trust him and feel a sense of brotherhood with him because he claimed to respect them and support their patriotic ideals.

References page format:
References
Allen, J., & Holt McDougal. (2012). Holt McDougal Literature: Grade 11. Orlando, Fla: Holt McDougal/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Provide commentary for each example you draw from the text. The commentary should explain how the device effectively contributes to the overall purpose of the speech. The ratio is generally two commentaries for each detail. Do not just string one quote after another. You need to weave your commentary and your details together so that your essay flows smoothly from one idea to the next.

Since this essay involves more than one example of more than one rhetorical device, the ​organization is of utmost importance. Organize paragraphs about devices used by order of importance and organize details and examples within each paragraph chronologically (the order in which they appear).

Your conclusion should restate your main points and be insightful, but it must not be a repeat of your introduction. Avoid using the very same words you already used.

E.C. Class Discussion

Oct. 07, 2019 Max Points: 25

The Crucible Act One Character Map

Oct. 07, 2019 Max Points: 25

E.C. Newsela 10/1/19

No Due Date Max Points: 50
Description:

Finish your written response by 11:15 for 25 extra credit points
8 sentence, two quote minimum

Myth Outline

Sept. 10, 2019 Max Points: 50

Create Your Own Myth

Sept. 15, 2019 Max Points: 150

World on Turtle's Back Essay

Sept. 09, 2019 Max Points: 200
Description:

​Write a 2-page essay in APA format answering the following question: Creation stories often serve many purposes. According to Larry Evers and Paul Pavlich, scholars of Native American literature, such stories "remind the people of who and what they are, why they are in this particular place, and how then they ​should continue to live here." Do you think that "The World on Turtle's Back" fulfills these functions? Explain, citing evidence from the text to support your interpretation. ****Note: We had many in-class discussions about this topic. One example of this is how the story describes how the "twins" bring balance to the world. Cite examples from the text, using APA format.

Announcements

Oct. 16, 2019

The Crucible Full Text

Oct. 10, 2019

APA In-Text Citation Examples

Oct. 07, 2019
Oct. 01, 2019

Sinners in the Hands of an Angry of God

Oct. 01, 2019

If you were absent today, please do the Newsela "Salem Revisited"... 10/01/19...Minimum of eight sentences and two quotes, answering the following question:

Sept. 26, 2019

Facts of the case

Johnson v. M'Intosh
In 1775, Thomas Johnson and other British citizens purchased land in Virginia from members of the Piankeshaw Indian tribe under a 1763 proclamation by the King of England. When he died, Thomas Johnson left this land to his heirs. In 1818, William M'Intosh purchased from Congress 11,000 acres of the land originally purchased by Johnson. Johnson's heirs sued M'Intosh in the United States District Court to recover the land. Ruling that the Piankeshaw tribe did not have the right to convey the land, the federal district court held that Johnson's initial purchase and the chain of title stemming from it were invalid.

Question
Can a Native American tribe convey land to individuals?

Conclusion
In a unanimous decision, the Court held M'Intosh's claim superior to Johnson's, affirming the district court. Chief Justice John Marshall established that the federal government had the sole right of negotiation with the Native American nations. The Indians themselves did not have the right to sell property to individuals. M'Intosh's claim, which was derived from Congress, was superior to Johnson's claim, which was derived from the non-existent right of Indians to sell their land.

Worcester v. Georgia
In September 1831, Samuel A. Worcester and others, all non-Native Americans, were indicted in the supreme court for the county of Gwinnett in the state of Georgia for "residing within the limits of the Cherokee nation without a license" and "without having taken the oath to support and defend the constitution and laws of the state of Georgia." They were indicted under an 1830 act of the Georgia legislature entitled "an act to prevent the exercise of assumed and arbitrary power by all persons, under pretext of authority from the Cherokee Indians." Among other things, Worcester argued that the state could not maintain the prosecution because the statute violated the Constitution, treaties between the United States and the Cherokee nation, and an act of Congress entitled "an act to regulate trade and intercourse with the Indian tribes." Worcester was convicted and sentenced to "hard labour in the penitentiary for four years." The U.S. Supreme Court received the case on a writ of error.

Question
Does the state of Georgia have the authority to regulate the intercourse between citizens of its state and members of the Cherokee Nation?

Conclusion
No. In an opinion delivered by Chief Justice John Marshall, the Court held that the Georgia act, under which Worcester was prosecuted, violated the Constitution, treaties, and laws of the United States. Noting that the "treaties and laws of the United States contemplate the Indian territory as completely separated from that of the states; and provide that all intercourse with them shall be carried on exclusively by the government of the union," Chief Justice Marshall argued, "The Cherokee nation, then, is a distinct community occupying its own territory in which the laws of Georgia can have no force. The whole intercourse between the United States and this nation, is, by our constitution and laws, vested in the government of the United States." The Georgia act thus interfered with the federal government's authority and was unconstitutional. Justice Henry Baldwin dissented for procedural reasons and on the merits.

Dawes Act
Approved on February 8, 1887, "An Act to Provide for the Allotment of Lands in Severalty to Indians on the Various Reservations," known as the Dawes Act, emphasized severalty, the treatment of Native Americans as individuals rather than as members of tribes.

Federal Native American policy during the period from 1870 to 1900 marked a departure from earlier policies that were dominated by removal, treaties, reservations, and even war. The new policy focused specifically on breaking up reservations by granting land allotments to individual Native Americans. Very sincere individuals reasoned that if a person adopted white clothing and ways, and was responsible for his own farm, he would gradually drop his Indian-ness and be assimilated into the population. It would then no longer be necessary for the government to oversee Indian welfare in the paternalistic way it had been obligated to do, or provide meager annuities that seemed to keep the Indian in a subservient and poverty-stricken position.

Sept. 25, 2019

Structure:

Last, F. M. (Year, Month Date Published). Article title. Retrieved from URL

Example:

Satalkar, B. (2010, July 15). Water aerobics. Retrieved from http://www.buzzle.com

Cain, K. (2012, June 29). The Negative effects of Facebook on communication. Social Media Today RSS. Retrieved from http://socialmediatoday.com

Sept. 23, 2019

In my absence, independently continue reading the Sinners in the Angry Hands of God and complete the comprehension questions as well.

EXTRA CREDIT: Extra 30 points to students who stay on task and complete the Sinners in the Angry Hands of God questions.

Sept. 12, 2019

Federal Native American Policy Presentation

Sept. 09, 2019

Transitional Phrases
https://writingcenter.ashford.edu/transitional-phrases

Sept. 06, 2019

World on Turtle's Back Citation Guide:

References
Allen, J., & Holt McDougal. (2012). "World on Turtle's Back". Holt McDougal Literature: Grade 11. Orlando, Fla: Holt McDougal/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

In-text Citation:
(Allen & Holt McDougal, 2012)

(Allen & Holt McDougal, 2012, p._)

Aug. 29, 2019

According to Larry Evers and Paul Pavlich, scholars of Native American literature, such stories "remind the people of who and what they are, why they are in this particular place, and how then should continue to live here." Do you think that "The World on Turtle's Back" fulfills these functions? Please consider this question tonight for homework and be prepared to discuss in class tomorrow.

Aug. 29, 2019

Behold! The brave muskrat.

Aug. 29, 2019

According to Larry Evers and Paul Pavlich, scholars of Native American literature, such stories "remind the people of who and what they are, why they are in this particular place, and how then they ​should continue to live here." Do you think that "The World on Turtle's Back" fulfills these functions? Please consider this question tonight for homework and be prepared to discuss in class tomorrow.